I received this book for free from Scholastic Press in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

This book may be unsuitable for people under 14 years of age due to its use of language, mental illness, sexual content, drug and alcohol use, and/or violence.
{Hey, Kiddo: Jarrett J. Krosoczka}Hey, Kiddo by Jarrett J. Krosoczka
Published by Graphix on October 9, 2018
Genres: Graphic Novels, Memoir, Young Adult
Pages: 320
Format: Paperback
Source: Scholastic Press
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{Synopsis} – Hey, Kiddo is the graphic memoir of author-illustrator Jarrett J. Krosoczka. Raised by his colorful grandparents, who adopted him because his mother was an incarcerated heroin addict, Krosoczka didn’t know his father’s name until he saw his birth certificate when registering for a school ski trip. Hey, Kiddo traces Krosoczka’s search for his father, his difficult interactions with his mother, his day-to-day life with his grandparents, and his path to becoming an artist.

To date, nearly one million people have viewed Krosoczka’s TED Talk about his experience. Artwork from his childhood and teen years will be incorporated into the original illustrations for the book.

{My thoughts} – I am a huge fan of Jarrett J. Krosoczka’s illustrations in the Jedi Academy books. When I’d seen this book was coming out I wanted to read it so that I could learn more about the artist and writer. Jarrett didn’t have what would be considered a normal upbringing but to him and his family it was by all accounts normal. It was all he or they knew.

As an adult I am able to relate to a lot of the issues and struggles mentioned within the pages of this book. I can relate to being raised by my grandparents. I can relate to them not always getting along and lots of arguing and fighting. I can relate to the alcohol abuse by one grandparent. Although. in my case it was my grandfather that did the drinking and my grandmother that did most of the yelling. I can relate to not having a mother or a father around. I can relate to having a mother being in and out of my life, but for different reasons then that of what Jarrett’s mother had gone through. I can relate to not knowing or meeting my father until I was well into my teenage years. I can relate to considering my grandparents were my only parents. I can relate to all of that and more within the pages of this book.

Jarrett might not have had the ideal childhood, but he did something that most people don’t. He didn’t let himself become a victim of circumstances and situation and he made the most out of what life had offered him. He proved to his grandparents that his true passion was in his art and they supported him attending art school. Through that support from his family he was able to make a name for himself. He was able to be someone. He was able to be better then his own mother and father.

I really enjoyed reading through this book. At many points it made me feel sad for him and what he’d been through. At other points it made me want to laugh and cry. Through his words and illustrations he was able to pull me into the story of his life. He was able to show me what he’d been through, what he’d overcome and what he was able to achieve.

I recommend this book for any child that is mature enough to handle the content and the language within it’s pages. There is so much that can be learned from within the pages of this book and it would be a crime to prevent children from reading it and seeing that they can become more, with the proper support and desire to be more then their circumstances.

Final Conclusion: 5 Star Rating.